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90% OF INCIDENTS ARE CAUSED BY

HUMAN ERROR

Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMS)

Implementing a successful FRMS can significantly improve safety in your operation

FRMS Basics

Many of the challenges that operations face when implementing a FRMS refer to misconception and misleading definitions of Human Fatigue.

What is Fatigue?

A simple yet comprehensive operational definition of Human Fatigue is a key element for the successful implementation of a sound FRMS.

Fatigue & Tiredness

Fatigue, Tiredness and Drowsiness are not the same thing. When supervisors and managers use them indistinctively, significant operational errors occure.

Normal Response

Human Fatigue is not an illness, but a normal physiological response in healthy people. Thus, supervisors and managers need to be acquainted with the basic specifications of the “Human Machine”.

Successful FRMS

The successful implementation of effective and efficient FRMS in High Risk Operations require a clear understanding on how fatigue is measured and controlled.

Measure Fatigue

Monitoring workers’ level of fatigue is crucial for an effective and efficient FRMS. This monitoring MUST be predictive, allowing the operation to manage the risk.

Control Fatigue

Defining effective and efficient countermeasures to boost the levels of alertness of workers is a key component of a robust FRMS.

Is Fatigue a Risk?

Is Human Fatigue a real hazard in my operation? If it is, how much does it impact the efficiency and cost of my operation? These are key questions that must be answered  by managers and supervisors.

Consultation

There are important elements to take into consideration when implementing a comprehensice and robust FRMS in your operation.

Staff Level Analysis

Do we have the necessary manpower to satisfy the our operational demands? This is one of the most significant contributing factor for high levels of fatigue in high risk operations.

Work Shift Pattern Analysis

The work shift pattern is by far, the most important contributing factor for high levels of fatigue in the operation. Quantifying and qualifying this risk is a key element for designing an effective and efficient FRMS.

Training

Fatigue Risk Management is everybody’s business in 24/7 operations. Workers, supervisors and managers need specific tools in order to implement effective and efficient countermeasures.

FRMS Implementation Challenge

A guided 3-month FRMS implementation process

90% OF INCIDENTS ARE CAUSED BY

HUMAN ERROR

Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMS)

Implementing a successful FRMS can significantly improve safety in your operation

FRMS Basics

Many of the challenges that operations face when implementing a FRMS refer to misconception and misleading definitions of Human Fatigue.

What is Fatigue?

A simple yet comprehensive operational definition of Human Fatigue is a key element for the successful implementation of a sound FRMS.

Fatigue & Tiredness

Fatigue, Tiredness and Drowsiness are not the same thing. When supervisors and managers use them indistinctively, significant operational errors occure.

Normal Response

Human Fatigue is not an illness, but a normal physiological response in healthy people. Thus, supervisors and managers need to be acquainted with the basic specifications of the “Human Machine”.

Successful FRMS

The successful implementation of effective and efficient FRMS in High Risk Operations require a clear understanding on how fatigue is measured and controlled.

Measure Fatigue

Monitoring workers’ level of fatigue is crucial for an effective and efficient FRMS. This monitoring MUST be predictive, allowing the operation to manage the risk.

Control Fatigue

Defining effective and efficient countermeasures to boost the levels of alertness of workers is a key component of a robust FRMS.

Is Fatigue a Risk?

Is Human Fatigue a real hazard in my operation? If it is, how much does it impact the efficiency and cost of my operation? These are key questions that must be answered  by managers and supervisors.

Consultation

There are important elements to take into consideration when implementing a comprehensice and robust FRMS in your operation.

Staff Level Analysis

Do we have the necessary manpower to satisfy the our operational demands? This is one of the most significant contributing factor for high levels of fatigue in high risk operations.

Work Shift Pattern Analysis

The work shift pattern is by far, the most important contributing factor for high levels of fatigue in the operation. Quantifying and qualifying this risk is a key element for designing an effective and efficient FRMS.

Training

Fatigue Risk Management is everybody’s business in 24/7 operations. Workers, supervisors and managers need specific tools in order to implement effective and efficient countermeasures.

FRMS Implementation Challenge

A guided 3-month FRMS implementation process

Clients

Nice to meet you!

Fatigue Risk Management System

Safety and Human Behaviors

     Clients

     Nice to meet you!

     Fatigue Risk Management

     Safety and Human Behaviors

Work Shift Pattern Analysis

 

 

solicitud de Descarga Exitosa

Staff - Work Load Balance Analysis

 

 

solicitud de Descarga Exitosa

Bio-Psycho-Social Analysis of Workers

 

 

solicitud de Descarga Exitosa

Análisis de Turnicidad

 

 

solicitud de Descarga Exitosa

Análisis de Dotación de Personal

 

 

solicitud de Descarga Exitosa

Análisis Bio-Psico-Social de los Empleados

 

 

solicitud de Descarga Exitosa